A Winter Concert to warm your heart

The DSP orchestra with its 50 talented musicians warmed the audience’s hearts during their annual Winter Concert with a varied programme which included numerous soloists who complemented the orchestra’s performance with song, dance and musical highlights.

 

The event celebrated 30 years since the school began integrating learners from Mamelodi and Eersterust  and also marked the reunification of Germany with the coming down of the Berlin Wall at the end of the cold war.

 

The evening’s programme got off to a chilly start with the music from the movie “Frozen”. The audience slowly thawed with the classics from Brahms, Bach and Beethoven. The temperature rose once the orchestra delivered the Tango „Por una cabeza“ by Carlos Gardel. The musicians taught the audience „How to train your dragon“ by John Powell and ended the evening on a high note with a „Michael Jackson Hit Mix“ arranged by Johnnie Vinson.

 

The concert’s highlights included performances by some of the gifted learners in the school’s integration programme. These included Moalosi Ntai, who wowed attendees with the violin, Lehlogonolo Chabalala, whose clarinet rendition of George Michael’s “Careless Whisper” was well-received and Dipalesa Phalatse who impressed with Beyonce’s “Sweet Dreams” and with vocal duties in the orchestra’s take of the James Bond theme song, “Skyfall”. Sonja Kirsch, who trains and conducts the orchestra, is proud of this group of dedicated learners under her wing: “The beauty of music is that is brings learners from various backgrounds and abilities together to perform as one.”

 

She bemoaned the loss of musicians at the end of each school year but was impressed by the way in which learners like Melanie Nowack had matured. Nowack put in an accomplished performance of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 8.

 

A music video of the fall of the Berlin Wall compiled by Jonas Nottmeier for his music practical evaluation was also shown on the evening. “Music has an important role to play at the school because of the history of Germany,” said Wolfgang Ehrich, DSP deputy principal. Integrating language, music and interpretation, whilst using music and history were some of the tasks required of learners, said Ehrich.